Mar 6th 2019

Security and diversity – buzzwords with substance

Security cameras mounted on wall

Amidst the buzz and commotion that MWC brings for telecoms and service providers, there’s another equally large beast that stirs at a similar time every year. For the security industry, the US-based edition of the RSA Conference is one of the most important events of the year. Spawned in 1991 as a small conference focusing on cryptography, it has now evolved into one of the behemoths of the security industry alongside BlackHat and Infosecurity Conference.

With over 45,000 people expected to attend the US conference this year, and more attending shows in Europe, Asia or the UAE, this is a conference series that is not to be missed. Whether looking to exhibit, speak or just soak up the atmosphere and learn something new, the presence and opportunity for networking that these conferences afford is clear – there is rarely a show for the infosecurity industry that gives so much and affords so much opportunity to learn. Babel represents clients at these types of shows throughout the year; this year SecureData is present at RSA and giving a talk on Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning-driven potential cyberattacks!

Trade shows such as this are a unique opportunity to see what competitors are talking about, as well as learn of new technological developments. All of this can play into a strong PR campaign that can really boost knowledge and perception of your organisation – whether one is speaking at the show or not. Combine this with face-to-face influencer interaction that may not be possible throughout the rest of the year, and you have a winning recipe.

Diversity is key…

Among the topics being discussed this week in San Francisco (which include artificial intelligence in security, successful journeys into the cloud, and unconventional approaches to security challenges), one of the most interesting and crucial is that of diversity in the cybersecurity space. This is exactly the topic that Sylvia Acevedo, CEO of Girl Scouts of the USA is discussing, and one that I’m disappointed to be missing out on.

I, of course, say this as a white male in his late 20s, so may not be seen as qualified to comment, but it occurs to me that diversity (in security especially), is something that is no longer a ‘nice to have’ but a critical component of industry. If the NCSC says this is the case, I’m inclined to believe them – and the industry should do too. From increased revenues to different perspectives on the same problems, diversity can really boost a company’s capabilities. Sylvia’s background is astounding, and I find it brilliant that she is now using her platform to further the fight for a better diversity base in the infosec sector. Anyone that chooses to fight this is not only closed-minded but is startlingly blind to the future.

I’ve seen first-hand the benefits that students of different backgrounds gave to my own university and professional experiences. I’ve seen the success that the Cyber Discovery programme is having in bringing cybersecurity to students of all socio-economic backgrounds, genders, and scholastic abilities. Whether it’s a variety of spokespeople, or even involvement in diversity initiatives, the security industry does a good job of showing that it has the right mentality to improve on its current glut of male-only representatives.

…across all industries

It’s critical that companies speak out to show the good work that they’re doing for increasing diversity in industry, as we all know that a diverse team is one of the most powerful things that you can have behind you. This can easily be supported with a communications programme fortified with solid and targeted media relations, top-notch content creation and years of combined experience at trade shows. If that’s what you’re looking for, Babel should be at the top of your list. Cybersecurity is one of our specialities, and it’s something we enjoy talking about. Drop us a line to see how we can help.


Babel PR